Secrets Among the Trees: The Festival of the Trees Returns to Arboreality

The Festival of the Trees 39 will be hosted here at Arboreality on the theme of Secrets.
But first, the current Festival of the Trees:
The Festival of the Trees 38 comes to us from Chennai, India compliments of Arati at Trees , Plants and more. Highlights for me include a peek at the Eastern Black Walnut (Juglans nigra), so beloved in my former Pennsylvania home, the evergreen Christmas tree farms of North Carolina, and the Jack Fruit tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus), a tree whose equal I have never seen. And then, there’s the mango tree reputed to be “3500 years old [and] bears fruit of a different taste in each branch.”
Thank you, Arati, for bringing us such arboreal diversity and splendor!
Coming up next:
The Festival of the Trees 39 brings this green blog carnival back to Arboreality.
This month’s theme: Secrets
Forests, farms, gardens, urban trees, and ancient-rock-clinging-wind-whipped Bristlecone pine stands can be an escape, a place to hide, a space to rest, a home for buried treasure. This month, I invite you to reveal a small glimpse of a secret among the trees. Consider the quiet spots you go to sit, the trees which have stood in silent observation of the events of your life, the aromatic memory of the garden from a place you have visited. With word, image, sound, or otherwise inspired creation, give us a peek at what you see, or what you can imagine.
Gather your tree-materials, post online, and send me the link:
trees[at]brainripples[dot]com
Deadline for submissions is August 28, 2009.
Questions, comments, suggestions? Drop me an email.

Nest in Young Hemlocks, Copyright © 2009 Jade Leone Blackwater

The Festival of the Trees 39 will be hosted in September 2009 at Arboreality  – Tree Blogging on the theme of Secrets.

But first, the current Festival of the Trees:

The Festival of the Trees 38 comes to us from Chennai, India compliments of Arati at Trees , Plants and more. Highlights for me include a peek at the Eastern Black Walnut (Juglans nigra), so beloved in my former Pennsylvania home, the evergreen Christmas tree farms of North Carolina, and the Jack Fruit tree (Artocarpus heterophyllus), a tree whose equal I have never seen. And then, there’s the mango tree reputed to be “3500 years old [and] bears fruit of a different taste in each branch.”

Thank you, Arati, for bringing us such arboreal diversity and splendor!

Coming up next:  The Festival of the Trees 39 brings this green blog carnival back to Arboreality – Tree Blogging created by yours truly, writer and naturalist Jade Leone Blackwater from the forests of the Pacific Northwest.

This month’s theme:  Secrets

“Forests, farms, gardens, urban trees, and ancient-rock-clinging-wind-whipped Bristlecone pine stands can be an escape, a place to hide, a space to rest, a home for buried treasure. This month, I invite you to reveal a small glimpse of a secret among the trees. Consider the quiet spots you go to sit, the trees which have stood in silent observation of the events of your life, the aromatic memory of the garden from a place you have visited. With word, image, sound, or otherwise inspired creation, give us a peek at what you see, or what you can imagine.”

Gather your tree-materials, post online, and send the link to Jade Blackwater:

trees[at]brainripples[dot]com

Deadline for submissions is August 28, 2009.

Questions, comments, suggestions?  Contact Jade.

_________________________

The Festival of the Trees is a monthly blog carnival for all things arboreal. Like other blog carnivals, The Festival of the Trees is a collection of links to blog posts and other spots on the web, hosted each month at a different blog. To learn how to take part in the festivities, please visit The Festival of the Trees coordinating blog.

We are seeking volunteers to host The Festival of the Trees #40 and beyond! This is a great way to broaden your audience, and of course – have fun in the trees.

To learn more, contact Dave (bontasaurus[at]yahoo[dot]com) and Pablo (editor[at]roundrockjournal[dot]com), and visit the Volunteer to Host page for details.

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